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An Anonymous Girl Reviewed By Ekta R. Garg of Bookpleasures.com
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Ekta R. Garg

Reviewer Ekta Garg: Ekta has actively written and edited since 2005 for publications like: The Portland Physician Scribe; the Portland Home Builders Association home show magazines; ABCDlady; and The Bollywood Ticket. With an MSJ in magazine publishing from Northwestern University Ekta also maintains The Write Edge- a professional blog for her writing. In addition to her writing and editing, Ekta maintains her position as a “domestic engineer”—housewife—and enjoys being a mother to two beautiful kids.

 
By Ekta R. Garg
Published on January 9, 2019
 

Authors: Greer Hendricksand Sarah Pekkanen

Publisher: St. Martin’s Press

ISBN: 978-1-250-13373-1




Authors: Greer Hendricksand Sarah Pekkanen

Publisher: St. Martin’s Press

ISBN: 978-1-250-13373-1

A woman joins a psychology study as a way to make some quick cash, only to discover that she’s been drawn into a situation that runs past academics. The longer she stays in the study, the more questions she begins to ask even as she realizes that every question might bring her closer to the destruction of her own life. Co-authors Greer Hendricks and Sarah Pekkanen return after a successful debut with another fun thriller in their latest book An Anonymous Girl.

At 28, Jessica Farris seems to have the life any young single person would want. She lives in New York City and works as a makeup artist. At one time she even joined the teams behind off-Broadway shows. Although she’s technically a freelancer now, Jessie has landed a steady position with BeautyBuzz. They send clients her way who want makeup done for a variety of special occasions

Despite the good relationship she’s built with BeautyBuzz, Jessie still struggles with her finances. Her parents bear all the responsibility for taking care of her younger sister, Becky, and all the medical bills that come with her condition. Countless times Jessie has put money toward Becky’s bills without telling her parents. While she’s happy to help her family, the strain—both financial and emotional—of doing so weighs Jessie down all the time.

When she finds out about an opportunity to earn extra money by participating in a psychology study on morality and ethics, she jumps at the chance. After all, she reasons, how hard can it be to answer some questions? The professor, Dr. Shields, gets his data, Jessie gets the $500, and she doesn’t have to worry about her rent for this month.

The questions catch Jessie completely off guard, however. They challenge her to dig deeper inside herself that anyone has done in a long time…or maybe ever. Dr. Shields, too, surprises Jessie, first because the professor is a woman and secondly because she seems to have a way to pull out Jessie’s deepest hurts and soothe them.

In exchange for what begins to feel more like therapy and less like a study, Jessie agrees to participate in real-life experiments for Dr. Shields. She meets people, asks questions, initiates encounters. Throughout the process, however, Jessie’s gut begins sending her warning signals and she figures out that Dr. Shields has an ulterior motive for the experiments and the entire study. What she’ll need to find out is how she can extract herself from the entire situation before she gets too entangled.

Co-authors Greer Hendricks and Sarah Pekkanen offer readers a taut thriller. Protagonist Jessie comes across as likeable and relatable. Even though Hendricks and Pekkanen gloss over some of the minor details—Jessie’s relationships with her friends and even her parents—Jessie herself will convince readers to stick with the book all the way to the end. Equally fascinating is Dr. Lydia Shields. She’s the perfect antagonist, smart, rich, well-spoken, and always put together. The motive for her study may not feel new, but her execution of her reasons for it will keep readers flipping pages.

The last few pages, too, feel like the best conclusion for all characters involved, even if they come across as a little rushed. Readers will appreciate a win for women, although the last few paragraphs of the book come across as underwhelming. A big victory requires a closing just as smart and intriguing as the rest of the story. Greer and Pekkanen don’t quite deliver on that aspect, but the rest of the book stands out and readers will forgive them the lack of a punchy closing sentence.

Fans of good thrillers will definitely love this one. I recommend readers Binge An Anonymous Girl.