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Siren’s Feast: An Edible Odyssey Reviewed By Emily Decobert Of Bookpleasures.com
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Emily Decobert

Reviewer Emily Decobert: Emily graduated from Kentucky Wesleyan College with degrees in History and Psychology and a Masters in Library Media from Western Kentucky University.  She spent a few years being a teacher and librarian until she left to help run her husband's business and work on her novels.  Emily reads about five books a week and loves reviewing.  She is a book reviewer for bookpleasures.com and other publishers. Click here to access Emily's blog.



 
By Emily Decobert
Published on June 16, 2009
 


Author: Nancy Mehagian
Publisher: Cielo Press
ISBN: 978-0-9799305-0-8

Nancy Mehagian has lived a life that is the stuff of legends.  Wild and free, traveling and tripping on drugs, she lived more before thirty than most of us live in a lifetime.  And, we’re so jealous.


Author: Nancy Mehagian
Publisher: Cielo Press
ISBN: 978-0-9799305-0-8

Click Here To Purchase Siren's Feast, An Edible Odyssey

Nancy Mehagian has lived a life that is the stuff of legends.  Wild and free, traveling and tripping on drugs, she lived more before thirty than most of us live in a lifetime.  And, we’re so jealous.

Nancy was a child of an affluent Armenian family who worked their way into the American dream.  Her mother was not only the perfect stay at home mom, she was a world-class chef, and waited on Nancy’s father hand and foot as a Armenian wife should.  Holidays were wonderful orgies of food and family.  Her father, much older than her mother, retired while Nancy was a child and her father began making good on his promise to give his wife everything she wanted.  Soon there were trips to California and Hawaii, lots of decadence and luxury.

The cosseted younger daughter she was protected, perhaps smothered, by parents who wanted the best for her.  She went to college and was unable to continue the strict life still under her parent’s thumb.  She took her first trip to Spain and Morocco, on route to a semester in Italy, and she could never look back.  There was independence, excitement, and drugs.  In Morocco she dropped acid and smoked hashish, practicing the free love that was a major part of the 60’s.  A wild flower child, she would not be satisfied in the US.

 She soon answered the Siren’s song and found her way to the island of Ibiza, believed to be the home of Homer’s sirens, where a relaxed hippie community was forming.  It was parties, drugs, and people who were kind and generous.  Total strangers would offer to take waifs in and Nancy became part of a large, loving community.  Living with whoever, she became the group’s chef and soon was encouraged to open a vegetarian restaurant.  With the help of friends, she got a place and opened the Double Duck.

While life was good, Nancy had the travel bug and rented out the restaurant to go to India, chasing enlightenment and love.  She returned to Ibiza, but was unable to settle and fled to Beirut.  It would be here her luck would begin to run out.  She had an affair with a married man and while it led to the joy of pregnancy, she was expecting and stuck in the Middle East.  Young and trusting, she accepted tickets to London and was arrested for drug smuggling.  She hadn’t known she was being used to get hashish into England.

Given prison time, she entered prison with her newborn daughter in her arms.  A nurturer and chef at heart, she watched over the babies of the other women and pushed to have healthy food for the prisoners.  She was so determined she grew her own vegetables, made baby food, and worked to give her daughter, herself, and the other little ones a healthy diet.

Finally, her days of drugs and roving over, she settled down in the US with her precious daughter and became a practitioner of Jin Shin Jyutsu.  She was still a chef, but she refused to open another restaurant, choosing to feed friends and family and to give to strangers the relief from pain with her healing art.

I read this book in one day, unable to put it down.  It is an incredible rush as we race along with Nancy, searching for freedom and enlightenment.  Everyone will identify with her quest and will envy her bravery that led to the years she spent abroad.  Can we find such a life in the 21st century or was it simply a chance of that carefree time?  Perhaps because it is not possible, readers will jump at this chance to be an armchair tag along.

 Click Here To Purchase Siren's Feast, An Edible Odyssey