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Tiffany Girl Reviewed By Conny Withay of Bookpleasures.com
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Conny Withay







Reviewer Conny Withay:Operating her own business in office management since 1991, Conny is an avid reader, volunteers reading the Bible to the elderly, and makes handmade jewelry. A cum laude graduate with a degree in art living in the Pacific Northwest, she is married with two sons, two daughter-in-laws, and one granddaughter.

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By Conny Withay
Published on April 24, 2015
 
Author: Deeanne Gist
Publisher: Howard Books
ISBN: 978-1-4767-3853-6



Follow Here To Purchase Tiffany Girl: A Novel


Author: Deeanne Gist
Publisher: Howard Books
ISBN: 978-1-4767-3853-6

Being a New Woman isn’t exactly how I’d pictured it. Don’t misunderstand, I love the independence and I love working at Tiffany’s, absolutely love it, but things just aren’t what I expected,” Flossie explains in Deeanne Gist’s novel, Tiffany Girl.

At five hundred and forty-four pages, this thick hardbound targets those who enjoy Christian historical fiction during America’s late nineteenth century concerning women’s rights. With no profanity, sexual scenes, or extreme violence, topics of physical, mental, and verbal abuse of women may not be appropriate for immature readers. With acknowledgements, a note to the reader, and prologue at the beginning of the book, an author’s note regarding facts versus fiction, credits, a reading group guide with enhancements and a conversation with the writer complete the book.

Having received several writing awards, author Gist has sold three-quarters of a million books, mainly geared toward fun historical romances. Living in Texas with her husband, she has four grown children.

In this tale based loosely on a true story, twenty-one-year-old Flossie Jayne detests sewing alongside her mother to make ends meet. Deciding she wants to become a New Woman who can make her decisions and money, she moves to a New York boarding house and lands a job with the famous Tiffany stained glass maker because the men working there went on strike.

Loving her newly found freedom, the naïve young adult who loves to paint is fascinated with her life of employment although it involves endless hours preparing glass windows for the chapel Tiffany plans to display at Chicago’s 1893 World’s Fair.

Fellow boarder Reeve Wilder, a shy and awkward newspaper reporter, is captivated by the outgoing chatterbox, wanting to protect her from the bustle pinchers that want to have their way with women. Initially finding her obnoxious, he is asked to write a fictional series about the life of New Women and uses her as his model.

As the two slowly morph from their sheltered cocoons, they start noticing each other and their attraction. As entertaining Flossie works her way into Reeve’s chauvinistic heart, both are forced to change their feelings about women working.

While learning about the colorful stained glass procedures and the women’s revolutionary movement, readers get caught up in how love alters one’s perspective when it comes to happiness and contentment.

Mentioning little Christianity, Gist does an excellent job keeping her characters engaged, whether it be a widow yearning for a son, the sensitive Tiffany owner, or the several women known as Tiffany Girls who would only be allowed to work if they stayed unmarried.

Thanks to Howard Books for furnishing this complimentary book in exchange for a review based on the reader’s opinions.