BookPleasures.com - http://www.bookpleasures.com/websitepublisher
Baby Lady’s Scary Night Reviewed By Cony Withay of Bookpleasures.com
http://www.bookpleasures.com/websitepublisher/articles/7462/1/Baby-Ladys-Scary-Night-Reviewed-By-Cony-Withay-of-Bookpleasurescom/Page1.html
Conny Withay







Reviewer Conny Withay:Operating her own business in office management since 1991, Conny is an avid reader, volunteers reading the Bible to the elderly, and makes handmade jewelry. A cum laude graduate with a degree in art living in the Pacific Northwest, she is married with two sons, two daughter-in-laws, and one granddaughter.

Follow Here To Read Conny's Blog


 
By Conny Withay
Published on April 1, 2015
 

Authors: Oksana & Marina Davydov
Illustrator: Ginger Triplett
Publisher: Outskirts Press, Inc.
ISBN: 978-1-4327-9965-6

Follow Here To Purchase Baby Lady's Scary Night: A Ladybug Story

Authors: Oksana & Marina Davydov
Illustrator: Ginger Triplett
Publisher: Outskirts Press, Inc.
ISBN: 978-1-4327-9965-6

And when you’re frightened, little bug, give your curtain a little tug. See the starry, starry sky, lie in moonlight, close your eyes. Feel my heartbeat, touch your chest. Remember, Mama loves you best,” Baby Lady is told in Oksana and Marina Davydov’s children’s book, Baby Lady’s Scary Night: A Ladybug Story.

This unnumbered forty page oversized paperback targets children four to seven years old, especially those that like bedtime stories. Containing rhyming sentences, the book’s multi-syllable words may be more complicated for beginner readers.

The authors are sisters who live in New York and love to write; this is their first children’s book. Illustrator Triplett’s colorful designs may be dark due to nighttime scenes, but they are detailed and expressive, showing multiple facial emotions.

With no profanity, the rhyming story may initially scare young readers who are afraid of the dark and allow their imaginations to take over when alone in bed. However, the book’s ending helps a child understand reality and observation.

This short tale begins with a ladybug named Baby Lady who has big blue eyes with dark eyelashes. After being kissed goodnight, she is tucked in bed by her loving mother. Left alone in the dark, Baby Lady looks around and thinks she sees a ghost. Alarmed and frightened, she wishes she had her mother nearby.

Next she notices something that looks like a creepy-crawly snake and a dangling hairy spider. She screams out for her mother, who comes to her rescue immediately. As the young bug cries, Mama Lady turns on the light. When Baby Lady claims she saw a ghost, snake, and spider, her mother explains they were simply a curtain, pair of tights, and a hairball. In the end, her mother reminds her that she loves her best.

As a book that focuses on being afraid of the dark, it is thoughtfully well-written. One minor concern might be that it may encourage some children alone in the dark at nighttime to look for objects they may perceive as scary due to the storyline.

Thanks to Bookpleasures and Outskirts Press for furnishing this complimentary book in exchange for a review based on the reader’s honest opinions.