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The Possible Police Reviewed By Conny Withay of Bookpleasures.com
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Conny Withay







Reviewer Conny Withay:Operating her own business in office management since 1991, Conny is an avid reader, volunteers reading the Bible to the elderly, and makes handmade jewelry. A cum laude graduate with a degree in art living in the Pacific Northwest, she is married with two sons, two daughter-in-laws, and one granddaughter.

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By Conny Withay
Published on November 30, 2014
 

Author: Wylde Scott
Illustrator: Hannah K. Shuping
Publisher: Wylde Scott
ISBN: 978-0-9960315-0-9


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Author: Wylde Scott
Illustrator: Hannah K. Shuping
Publisher: Wylde Scott
ISBN: 978-0-9960315-0-9

You have not seen, you do not know, what I can do, where I can go. These dreams of mine are meant to be. Just let me go, and you will see,” Wylde Scott writes in his children’s book, The Possible Police.

This over-sized thirty-two page hardbound with a matching glossy jacket cover targets preschool to early elementary school-aged children or those who grasp the concept of dreams and imagination with its boundless possibilities. With no profanity or violence, the darker drawings of the chasing possible police may frighten young ones.

Illustrator Shuping’s full page colorful drawings of magical scenes grace the pages with an easy-to-read black wording font. Most designs contain a grinning boy who believes he can do amazing things as he flies to the moon or paints a smile on a star. With some muted depictions blending into backgrounds, some interpretation leaves it up to the readers’ imaginations.

In this short story that is told in rhyme, a perky boy named after the author goes to bed one night and dreams that the possible police tell him he cannot do certain things because of rules and reasons. These persnickety cops lock the doors, nail his skates to the floor, and try to convince him not to attempt to fulfill his dreams.

Ever the optimist, the happy child starts his sleeping ventures visiting the moon, riding the wind, and capturing lightning in a jar, deciding strictly for himself what he wants to do. With the police chasing after him, he travels far away, sleeps on clouds, wrestles with bears, sails the sea in a bathtub, and teaches an elephant to dance. Riding on a seahorse, bouncing on pancakes, or finding a treasure map, dreams are one way to experience achieving goals. While the police stay on his heels, he is persistent in wanting to dream and believes that nothing is impossible for him to achieve.

Although no one can technically make fanciful, magical dreams come true, the theme of the book reiterates that one can reach a goal with persistence and dedication. With the rhyming words and the fast-moving scenes of the boy galloping across the universe, children may enjoy this as a calming bedtime story.

Thanks to the author for furnishing this complimentary book in exchange for a review based on the reader’s honest opinions.