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Higgledy Piggledy: A Tale of Four Little Pigs Reviewed By Norm Goldman of Bookpleasures.com
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Norm Goldman


Reviewer & Author Interviewer, Norm Goldman. Norm is the Publisher & Editor of Bookpleasures.com.

He has been reviewing books for the past fifteen years when he retired from the legal profession.

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By Norm Goldman
Published on July 15, 2014
 

Authors: Dr. B. Seymour Rabinovitch and Rebecca S. Treger

Illustrator: Mari Gayatri Stein

Publisher: Roxy Ann Press, LLC

ISBN: 978-0-9887474-0-1




Authors: Dr. B. Seymour Rabinovitch and Rebecca S. Treger

Illustrator: Mari Gayatri Stein

Publisher: Roxy Ann Press, LLC

ISBN: 978-0-9887474-0-1

The writing team of Dr. B. Seymour Rabinovitch and his granddaughter Rebecca S. Treger along with illustrator Mari Gayatri Stein have put together a delightful children's picture book that is both visually appealing and clever demonstrating how words and images can effectively blend together, each doing what they are supposed to do while delivering a simple but important message.

As cited in the introduction, Higgledy Piggledy: A Tale of Four Little Pigs was inspired by the English fairy tale, The Three Little Pigs that I am sure has been read countless times to tots all over the world including Dr. Rabinovitch's. Dr. Rabinovitch also mentions that due to his odd family name, he was often the target of ridicule when growing up in Montreal, Canada. Consequently, he and Rebecca have written a children's picture book concerning a funny-sounding name and the good things that came of it.

The narrative involves four piglets, Curly, Twirly, Whirly, and Higgledy Piggledy that lived in the little fictional town of Sudden. They were quite a contented family except that Higgledy Piggledy was teased by his brothers for having a name that rhymed like a joke. They insisted that he should have a name like theirs and be more like them. This saddened Higgledy Piggledy who speculated it would have been far painless to have a simple name like his brothers.

Matters were about to change and take on quite a different dimension when a big bad wolf moved next door to the piglets. Eyeing his neighbors, the wolf patted his stomach, licked his lips and thought to himself that he would love to devour these delicious piglets.

Initially, the four piglets were quite cautious when they left their house, but as we all know, one cannot be too careful and it didn't take long for the sly wolf to capture all of them. In captivity, the piglets were horrified at the thought that they would provide Mr. Wolf with his delicious meal. All the same, the devious Mr. Wolf was in no great hurry to enjoy his feast and wanted to have some fun with his neighbors. As a result, Mr. Wolf organized a game with the piglets telling them that he would give each one a chance to be free. In fact, he would permit them, one at a time, to escape, even giving them a head start. As soon as they would start running, he would call out their names and then would run after them to catch them. Mr. Fox was quite successful in re-capturing Curly, Twirly and Whirly, however, when it came to Higgledy Piggledy, he ran into difficulty pronouncing the piglet's name and as a result Higgledy Piggledy escaped and returned to his home. This did not deter Mr. Wolf from going ahead with his plan to eat the other three piglets. And as it turns out and before Mr. Wolf was able to accomplish this feat, Higgledy Piggledy outwitted him and managed to rescue his brothers. As for Mr. Wolf, apparently, he plunged into a hole in his home and some say he ended up in China or the other side of the world.

This engaging and interactive picture book serves as a first-class addition to other children's picture books covering the topics of diversity, self-acceptance, and gaining self-confidence, as well as helping children learn empathy and compassion for others. And perfectly complementing the tale are Mari Gayatri Stein's eye-catching twenty-two expressive images which help make an emotional connection to the characters. Make no mistake about it, there is plenty here to discuss with children about their likes or dislikes about the illustrations which no doubt will facilitate conversation about the book and its plot, even drawing in the most reluctant reader.

Follow Here To Read Norm's Interview With Author Rebecca S. Treger & Illustrator: Mari Gayatri Stein

Follow Here To Purchase Higgledy Piggledy: A Tale of Four Little Pigs