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Meet New York Times bestselling author and Former Editor in Chief of Cosmopolitan, Kate White
http://www.bookpleasures.com/websitepublisher/articles/6985/1/Meet-New-York-Times-bestselling-author-and-Former-Editor-in-Chief-of-Cosmopolitan-Kate-White/Page1.html
Norm Goldman


Reviewer & Author Interviewer, Norm Goldman. Norm is the Publisher & Editor of Bookpleasures.com.

He has been reviewing books for the past fifteen years when he retired from the legal profession.

To read more about Norm Follow Here






 
By Norm Goldman
Published on June 11, 2014
 



Norm Goldman, Publisher & Editor of Bookpleasures.com Interviews New York Times bestselling author and Former Editor in Chief of Cosmopolitan, Kate White



                                                                                                                                                                                  

Today, Bookpleasures.com is excited to have as our guest Kate White, New York Times bestselling author of nine works of fiction—six Bailey Weggins mysteries and three suspense novels, including, Eyes on You, which will be published in June. Her books have received starred reviews from a variety of publications and she has been covered everyplace from The Today Show to The New York Times. 

Kate was also Editor in Chief of Cosmopolitan magazine for fourteen years. Currently, she is editing the Mystery Writers of America cookbook, a selection of recipes from many of the top-selling authors. Kate is also the author of several very popular career books, including I Shouldn’t Be Telling You This: How to Ask for the Money, Snag the Promotion, and Create the Career You Deserve, and Why Good Girls Don’t Get Ahead but Gutsy Girls Do.

Norm:

Good day Kate and thanks for participating in our interview. 

How did you get started in writing? What keeps you going? As a follow up, why have you been drawn to writing suspense and mystery novel


Kate:

Like a lot of writers, I started really young, writing little plays and books and eventually a magazine I distributed in my high school.  But--and I'm sure you've heard this before--I was a huge Nancy Drew fan and that made me want to write mysteries. It's hard to know what keeps me going.I just know I can't stop!! As I wind down one book, I love mentally working out the idea for the next book. I also find writing to be a huge stress reliever. At night in bed I mentally lose myself in the story rather than being a worry wart!

Norm:
 

What makes a good suspense and mystery novel and why do you believe many of us read this genre?

Kate:

I love thrillers as well as mysteries but for me, the whodunit is the greatest pleasure. And I personally adore the ones where there are great clues and red herrings, and you kick yourself later for not figuring out who the killer is. I think the Inspector Wexford mysteries by Ruth Rendell are brilliant this way   

Norm:

How easy or difficult was it to transfer your skills as Editor in Chief of Cosmopolitan to writing fiction?

Kate: 

That was tricky. Journalism is all about telling and fiction is about showing so I had to spend a lot of time letting the urge to TELL burn off. I wrote many drafts to help me do this. 

Norm: 

Are you a plot or character writer?

Kate:

A reviewer once wrote that I managed to do both, which thrilled me. I try to work hard on my characters, but I'd say of ultimate importance to me is the plot and the twists that go with it. I'm a whodunit person. 

 
Norm:
 

Is your work improvisational or do you have a set plan?

Kate:

I always roughly plot out each book in advance. From the beginning I know who the killer is and the motive, and I begin to think about how I want to mislead the reader (in a way that he/she will find pleasurable!). But as I write, I plot out more specific details and sometimes I let things unfold in a way I may not have ever considered. That's part of the magic of writing. One great trick I learned from a lecture on creativity: Ask questions of the universe. I keep a notebook for each book and write out questions, like "What happens when she does that?" and the answers just come 

Norm:

How has your environment/upbringing colored your writing? 

Kate:

I've lived in New York City most of my life and I base my books primarily here, and that won't change.  An editor once suggested I write a book set in a small city and I had to tell her: I'm not that girl. I don't know that world well enough to write about it. One weird thing I've noticed about environment. I write really well in the heat. I live part of the year in South America and that helps guarantee that I'm writing in 80 degree weather a good part of the time.

Norm:

What has been the best part about being published?

Kate:

Connecting with my readers. I find that so fun. I love to learn about their lives. One reader wrote to say she named her daughter Bailey after Bailey Weggins, the main character in my mystery series. That was fabulous to hear. 

 
Norm:
 

If you had to choose, which writer would you consider a mentor?

Kate:

I don't have a mentor per se, but many mystery writers have been wonderfully helpful--like Linda Fairstein, Karin Slaughter, Harlan Coben, Lisa Scottoline. It's a field with many generous people who feel there's enough room for anyone who wants in

Norm:

What's the most difficult thing for you about being a writer?

Kate:

The solitary aspect. Most of the time I love that but I need  break from it from time to time.

Norm: 

Could you briefly tell our readers something about your most recent novel, Eyes on You?

Kate:

It's a psychological suspense about a TV host, Robin Trainer, who begins to realize that she has a secret enemy who wants to bring her down, maybe even kill her, and won't stop until that happens. What's terrifying is that she realizes it's someone in her own world, maybe even someone she trusts. 

Norm: 

What would you like to say to writers who are reading this interview and wondering if they can keep creating, if they are good enough, if their voices and visions matter enough to share?

Kate:

I just moderated a panel of fiction writers who said it's very important not to talk about your idea early on. It sucks the energy out. But at some point, it's probably good to get feedback. Don't be afraid. Wisdom so often follows criticism 

Norm: 

Where can our readers find out more about you and your books?

Kate: 

On my WEBSITE

Norm: 

What is next for Kate White?

Kate:

I'm writing a new suspense novel, which is due in Sept. And I'm thrilled to say that I just edited the Mystery Writers of America cookbook, which will be out next April. It's got recipes from tons of fab authors. 

Norm: 

As this interview draws to a close what one question would you have liked me to ask you? Please share your answer. 

Kate:

Who would you love to see play Robin in a movie version? I could so picture Elizabeth Banks in the role!

Norm: 

Thanks once again and good luck with your most recent book.

Follow Here To Purchase Eyes on You: A Novel of Suspense