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Conny Withay







Reviewer Conny Withay:Operating her own business in office management since 1991, Conny is an avid reader, volunteers reading the Bible to the elderly, and makes handmade jewelry. A cum laude graduate with a degree in art living in the Pacific Northwest, she is married with two sons, two daughter-in-laws, and one granddaughter.

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By Conny Withay
Published on April 29, 2014
 



Author: Matt Pelton
Publisher: Hobble Creek Press
ISBN: 978-1-4621-1264-7




Author: Matt Pelton
Publisher: Hobble Creek Press
ISBN: 978-1-4621-1264-7

Cooking pies in a Dutch oven is amazing because of how easy it is to control the temperature. All of the recipes in this book were designed for a ten-inch Dutch oven or a ten-inch cast-iron skillet,” Matt Pelton explains in his book, Dutch Oven Pies ~ Sweet & Savory.

At one hundred and twenty-eight pages, this paperback targets those interested in making pies with Dutch ovens or iron-cast skillets yet the recipes are adaptable for normal pie baking. With only a few black and white photographs, there are a limited amount of those showing finished products. A topical index is included along with the author’s short biography.

Back-to-back winner of the International Dutch Oven Society World Championship Cook-off, the author knows about baking pies, several types of pies. After an introduction, he divulges his secrets to making the perfect pie crust, using pastry techniques, and cooking with cast-iron, along with providing recipes on savory, sweet, and non-traditional pies.

Recommending a cast-iron skillet to bake pies, the Dutch oven can also be mastered by using parchment paper to remove the pie. Starting with the crust, Pelton says the best combination of a crust is two parts flour, one part fat, and enough water to bind.

Preferring lard over butter or shortening for flavor, he gives three crust recipes ranging from four to six ingredients, with his favorite addition being vinegar. In addition, tips on how to roll and put crust dough into the pan are included, along with pointers on latticing, antiquing, and blind baking.

The recipes include six quiches, six pot pies, six that use vegetables, five using meats, four with savory custard, and five “just-for-fun” pies, along with six fruit, five apple, five pumpkin, four sweet custard, three pudding, and four nut pies, ending with shepherd’s pie, cream cheese fruit pies, empanadas, and fruit tarts.

Next time the mood arises to make a delicious pie, try one of these creations by Matt: breakfast quiche, leftover turkey pot pie, ratatouille pie, Mediterranean chicken pie, spinach and mushroom custard pie, lasagna pie, low-sugar strawberry pie, sour cream apple pie, two-layer pumpkin pie, crème brulee pie, German chocolate pie, or salted caramel cashew pie.

With over sixty savory and sweet pie recipes, there are plenty of choices to make a delicious pie for special occasions, casual dinners and desserts, or to freeze for future use.

Thanks to Cedar Fort for furnishing this book in exchange for a review of the reader’s honest opinion.

Follow Here To Purchase Dutch Oven Pies: Sweet and Savory