Author: Gordon Osmond

Publisher: Secret Cravings Publishing

ASIN: B00JOWF2JY

Today, Bookpleasures.com is excited to have as our guest Gordon Osmond.

Gordon is a graduate of Columbia College and Columbia Law School, where he was the Decisions Editor of the Law Review. He has authored several plays, which have been produced throughout the USA.

Gordon is here today to discuss his most recent novel, Turner's Point which has just been published.

Norm:

Good day Gordon and thanks for participating in our interview.

It's my pleasure, Norman; very nice to be e-with you.

Norm:

How did you get started in writing? What keeps you going?

Gordon:

I think there's a point where a person realizes that writing is a means not only of communicating, but also of creating. For me, that moment first came in college. What keeps me going is the suspicion that there's a story out there that I can well tell. Also, the grocery and drug stores do a pretty fair job of keeping me going.

Norm:

How has your environment/upbringing, particularly your experiences as a produced award-winning playwright and an attorney, colored your writing?

Gordon:

My years as an attorney were a dominant influence in my development as a  writer. Those years provided an essential foundation for all the writing I did later on.  My years as a playwright taught me a lot  about the art of dialogue. 

Norm:

When writing your books, do you work from an outline?

Gordon:

Initially, the outline is all in my head, but later, as I write section by section , I reduce the outline to paper to be sure all the puzzle pieces are placed in a way that is not puzzling.

Norm:

What served as the primary inspiration for Turner's Point? As a follow up, did you write the story to express something you believe or was it just for entertainment?

Gordon:

My primary inspiration in writing creatively is always theme, which, in turn, shapes story. The theme of Turner's Point is the uniquly human ability to learn from mistakes, to atone to  those harmed by those mistakes, and to start anew on a path of reformation, redemption, and accomplishmet. That was my inspiration; I hope that it also can become that of the readers of Turner's Point. As for entertainment, that is always part of my three essentials in any sort of writing: engage, entertain, and, if you're lucky, enlighten.

Norm:

What was the most difficult part of writing Turner's Point and did you learn anything from writing the book? If so, what was it?

Gordon:

For me writing is an undiluted joy; the only difficulty is the nagging doubt that I could be doing it better. As for learning, I have always looked to readers and reviewers to give me ideas about how to improve.

Norm:

What would you say is the best reason to recommend someone to read Turner's Point?

Gordon:

 I think it's a painless, and perhaps even flavorful pill for someone who mistakenly believes they are locked in to the consequences of bad decisions made in the past.

Norm:

How did you develop the plot and characters in Turner's Point? Did you use any set formula? Are they based on people you know or have encountered or are they strictly fictional?

Gordon:

The plot was created from my imagination, informed, of course, by my life experiences. My characters are amalgams of people I have known, liked, loved, and detested.

Norman:

It is said that writers should write what they know. Were there any elements of Turner's Point that forced you to step out of your comfort zone, and if so, how did you approach this part of the writing?

Gordon:

I agree wholeheartedly with what "it is said."  I wouldn't know where to start writing about people  or places I don't know. However, in terms of emotional reactions to certain situations, I have heightened the intensity for dramatic purposes, and in that respect, I suppose I was, indeed, operating beyond the bounds of my comfort zone. It was fun!

Norm:

Where can our readers find out more about you and Turner's Point?

Gordon:

Serviceable synopses of and information about the book can be found on the usual online bookseller sites. Biographical info is also there. However, if one wants to know all about me, then the best bet is my "unauthorized" autobiography,   Wet Firecrackers: The Unauthorized Autobiography of Gordon Osmon, available at all onjline book sellers.  Sorry, Norman, couldn't resist an opportunity for a plug.

Norm:

What is next for Gordon Osmond?

Gordon:

I  always have a hard time with this question. When I wrote my first play, I thought it was my last.  Eight more followed. When I wrote my first book, I  had the same feeling, and three more followed. I do like changing genres, so maybe a libretto for an opera is next.  I'm only  half joking. I have a dynamite idea for a modern-day version of Der Rosenkavalier.

Norm:

As this interview draws to a close what one question would you have liked me to ask you? Please share your answer.

Gordon:

That's also tough because your questions have been so searching and thought provoking. If you were  to have asked how I  have been  most surprised by the experience of writing books, I would have answered, "The sources of support." If Turner's Point proves to be the success I think it will be, the answer  to that question will be irrelevant.

Norman:

Thanks once again and good luck with all of your future endeavors.

Gordon:

Thank you, Norman, particularly for your out-of-the-box questions.

Follow Here To Read Norm's Review of Turner's Point

Follow Here To Purchase Turner's Point