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More Forgotten Skills of Self-Sufficiency Reviewed By Conny Withay of Bookpleasures.com
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Conny Withay







Reviewer Conny Withay:Operating her own business in office management since 1991, Conny is an avid reader, volunteers reading the Bible to the elderly, and makes handmade jewelry. A cum laude graduate with a degree in art living in the Pacific Northwest, she is married with two sons, two daughter-in-laws, and one granddaughter.

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By Conny Withay
Published on February 27, 2014
 

Author: Caleb Warnock
Publisher: Hobble Creek Press
ISBN: 978-1-4621-1343-9






Author: Caleb Warnock
Publisher: Hobble Creek Press
ISBN: 978-1-4621-1343-9

Learn about self-seeding vegetables, build raised beds in your garden, collect water from rain and snow, find wild vegetables for everyday eating, and even make your own laundry soap,” the inside flap cover states in Caleb Warnock’s book, More Forgotten Skills of Self-Sufficiency.

At one hundred and eighty-four pages, this paperback targets individuals who want to be self-sufficient by eating off the land and surviving on their own. As a second book in the series, this has additional tips and techniques for living more efficiently.

Covering twenty-one chapters, the book starts out promoting learning to be a self-reliant family, not a prepared one. Recalling war rationing during 1942, victory gardens were established, but times have changed if America has to be reliant on its citizens.

With pictures of food and flowers blended with grandchildren and farming, the writer promotes bartering, growing food, and educating others about becoming self-reliant. Having a myriad of his own personal experiences, he explains what has and has not worked for his family and him.

Chapters include topics about no-nonsense household tips and buying old or reliable items to having full-year raised-bed gardens, eat wild edible vegetables, and know about self-seeding and the five mysteries of the garden to grow.

Although the writer plugs his all-natural weed killer that is only available on his website, he does give recipes for disinfecting water, dishwashing soap, toothpaste, laundry soap, stain cleaners, dryer sheets, and homemade diapers. The explanation of raised garden beds is detailed with many suggestions on building, planting, and harvesting. In addition to a monthly calendar of planting (including during the winter), a complete chapter is devoted to flowers to enjoy.

The last three chapters are real questions from readers with answers, lessons he has learned, and a call to train and educate others about being self-reliant. The ending has a bibliography, index, the author’s biography, and promotions of four other books.

Because pesticides and chemicals are used so abundantly on and in our foods, Warnock challenges the readers to become more reliant on themselves, especially to save money and survive if there is a crisis. Knowing many of his ideas can be found on the internet, this reference book is a good addition to the bookshelf, especially if or when the electricity goes out.

Thanks to Cedar Fort for furnishing this book in exchange for a review of the reader’s honest opinion.

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