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You Can Draw Bible Stories for Kids Reviewed By Conny Withay of Bookpleasures.com
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Conny Withay







Reviewer Conny Withay:Operating her own business in office management since 1991, Conny is an avid reader, volunteers reading the Bible to the elderly, and makes handmade jewelry. A cum laude graduate with a degree in art living in the Pacific Northwest, she is married with two sons, two daughter-in-laws, and one granddaughter.

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By Conny Withay
Published on January 28, 2014
 


Author and Illustrator: Sandy Silverthorne
Publisher: Harvest House Publishers
ISBN: 978-0-7369-5500-3




Author and Illustrator: Sandy Silverthorne
Publisher: Harvest House Publishers
ISBN: 978-0-7369-5500-3

Whether you’re an experience artist or you don’t know which end of the pencil to use, this book helps you learn how to sketch, design, create, and illustrate some really cool pictures. And all the while, you’ll be learning some awesome stuff from the Old and New Testaments,” Sandy Silverthorne writes in his book, You Can Draw Bible Stories for Kids.

Targeted toward ages seven to eleven years old, this one hundred and forty-six page large-index sized paperback can be read by any reader interested in quick, easy-to-draw figures and scenes, especially those involving Bible stories. Writing and illustrating for over twenty-five years, author Silverthorne’s small, rudimentary drawings cover almost every page.

The concept of the book is educational, showing how anyone can draw. Starting with the common stick figure of a person, the reader is taught simple changes and alterations to make the design more interesting.

By using nineteen stories from the Old and New Testament, subjects such as creation, Noah’s ark, Moses, Israel’s exodus, Jericho’s wall, Samson and Delilah, David and Goliath, Daniel in the lions’ den, and Jonah and the whale to Jesus’s birth and miracles, John the Baptist, Palm Sunday, and Christ’s resurrection are depicted.

Silverthorne starts his techniques simply by drawing a line or circle, adding a line here and there, and completing it with more detail. There are practice areas along with fill-in-the-blank sections to complete scenes. Since the spaces to draw in are small and limited, he suggests having extra paper available.

Besides the step-by-step tutorials, each chapter includes the Biblical story itself and how it relates to the reader. The stories are written in casual format and end with a “What’s the Big Idea” page applying it to one’s life.

Readers can create their own drawings as they learn about Joshua’s name and meaning, Elijah and Elisha’s hair or lack of it, or Zacchaeus being rich and short in stature. There is a focus on learning to draw animals and human facial emotions.

Although this reader wishes the book was larger in size and the drawings less sophomoric, this would make a neat gift for a young one wanting to draw or a good reference book for Sunday school classes to use visually to explain Bible stories. 

Thanks to Harvest House Publishers for furnishing this book in exchange for a review of the reader’s honest opinion.


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