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Meet Attorney & Novelist Pamela Samuels Young
http://www.bookpleasures.com/websitepublisher/articles/6474/1/Meet-Attorney-amp-Novelist--Pamela-Samuels-Young/Page1.html
Norm Goldman


Reviewer & Author Interviewer, Norm Goldman. Norm is the Publisher & Editor of Bookpleasures.com.

He has been reviewing books for the past fifteen years when he retired from the legal profession.

To read more about Norm Follow Here






 
By Norm Goldman
Published on October 21, 2013
 


Norm Goldman, Publisher & Editor of Bookpleasures.com Interviews Pamela Samuels Young, Attorney & Novelist


Bookpleasures.com is honored to have as our guest Pamela Samuels Young. Pamela is the author of Every Reasonable Doubt, In Firm Pursuit, Murder on the Down Low, Buying Time, and Attorney-Client Privilege. Her sixth novel, Anybody's Daughter, which tackles the horrific world of child sex trafficking, goes on sale in November 2013.

Pamela has also penned the short stories, Easy Money, featured in the anthology Scoundrels: Tales of Greed, Murder and Financial Crimes and Setup, selected for the Sisters in Crime anthology, LAndmarked for Murder. A natural hair enthusiast, Pamela is also the author of Kinky Coily: A Natural Hair Resource Guide. 

Pamela is a graduate of UC Berkeley’s School of Law and she has a bachelor's degree in journalism from USC and a master's degree in broadcasting from Northwestern University’s Medill School of Journalism. She previously served on the Board of Directors of the Los Angeles chapter of Mystery Writers of America and is a diehard member of Sisters in Crime, an organization dedicated to the advancement of women mystery writers.

In addition to her writing career and her law career, Pamela also speaks on the topics of writing, diversity, discrimination law and pursuing your passion. Pamela is married and lives in the Los Angeles area, where she attends Hope in Christ Community Church. 

Good day Pamela and thanks for participating in our interview.

Norm:

 

How did you get started in writing? What keeps you going?

Pamela:

When I finished law school many moons ago, I started reading legal thrillers. It always bugged me that none of the lawyers in the books I read where women or people of color. One day I decided that I would right a legal thriller and bring some diversity to the genre. From the moment I sat down at four o'clock in the morning to write those first few words, I knew I had discovered my passion. Nothing else could explain my willingness to spend every extra moment bent over my laptop. What keeps me going is the pleasure I get from the creative process. I'm always amazed at how a story idea grows and grows and grows. 

Norm:

What helps you focus when you write?

Pamela:

The sheer pleasure I get in creating characters and coming up with plot twists to entertain and surprise readers. There are times when I can plant myself in a corner at my neighborhood Starbucks or Panera bread and stay there for hours. I love the creative process. Focus has never been a problem for me and I've never had writer's block. Finding time to write is a treat. So there's no way I'm going to waste it staring at blank computer screen.  

Norm:

Why have you been drawn to writing legal thrillers? As a follow up, are there aesthetic advantages and disadvantages peculiar to the legal thriller? Does it have a particular form? 

Pamela:

I guess the fact that I'm a lawyer drew me to the genre. I'm a big fan of John Grisham and Scott Turow. I don't think the form differs much from any other type of mystery. Frankly, I think legal thrillers are easier to write because it's not a stretch to create a lawyer who's a scoundrel.

Norm: 

Is your work improvisational or do you have a set plan?

Pamela:

A little bit of both. I will think about a book for months before I sit down and start writing. The first thing I do is outline. Just a sentence or two per chapter. I see each chapter as a scene in a movie. I may spend three months on an outline, which is just a bare bones skeleton of my story. When I start writing, my goal is to complete a decent first draft. I don't do much rewriting along the way. Then once I'm finished, I will spend months rewriting. For me, the writing is definitely in the rewriting. 

Norm:

Does your writing career ever conflict with your career as an attorney? 

Pamela:

Absolutely. There are times when it's difficult to balance both. I stuck to my book-a-year goal between 2006 and 2009 releasing four legal thrillers. Then the law took over and my fifth book, Attorney-Client Privilege, wasn't released until 2012, a three-year gap. I had to face the reality that from a physical standpoint, I couldn't work all day and write nights, mornings and weekends and still be sane. Exhaustion literally took over and I had to take a break. But now I'm back on schedule, with Anybody's Daughter being released this year. I've been noodling another story idea for several months. I'll start writing before the end of the year, and hopefully release it late 2014.

Norm:

What's the most difficult thing for you about being a writer?

Pamela:

I'd have to say being a full-time lawyer and a part-time writer is the hardest part. That and getting publicity!

Norm: 

What do you see as the influences on your writing?

Pamela:

The biggest influences for me are good books, no matter what the genre. I love reading a story that grabs me. I love Tami Hoag, Scott Pratt and Walter Mosley. They write characters you care about and they put them in situations that make your heart pump. Joshilyn Jackson and Jonathan Tropper are two other writers I absolutely love.

Norm: 

Are experiences you write about in your books based on people you know, or events in your own life?

Pamela:

Definitely (but don't tell anybody). There are so many people in my life who are characters I simply couldn't make up. And as I lawyer, I always run across interesting cases. I have a file on my phone called "Story Ideas." Whenever I hear of something interesting, I jot down a few notes with the intent of using it for a future book. I'll never run out of story ideas.

Norm: 

Are you a plot or character writer?

Pamela:

Definitely plot! I love a good plot. I also love books that have multiple story lines. It's always my hope to grab the reader with twists and turns they never see coming. 

Norm:

Do you write the stories to express something you believe in or are they just for entertainment?

Pamela:

Both. Anybody's Daughter is definitely an example of that. When I learned about the world of child sex trafficking, I was horrified that this was actually going on and happening to so many young children. I want Anybody's Daughter to be an entertaining thriller, but I also want to open people's eyes to this tragedy and spur them to join the fight to do something about it.

Norm:

Could you tell us something about your most recent novel, Anybody's Daughter? 

Pamela:

In Anybody's Daughter, 13-year-old Brianna believes she's sneaking off to meet a boy she met on Facebook. To her horror, she's kidnapped by a ring of child sex traffickers. Her Uncle Dre, a man with his own criminal past, relies on his connections and street smarts in a desperate search to find her. With the help of his ex-girlfriend—an attorney who represents sexually exploited girls—Dre searches L.A.’s criminal underbelly and ultimately comes up with a daring plan that puts many lives in danger. But can he rescue Brianna before it's too late?

Norm: 

Where can our readers find out more about you and your novels?

Pamela:

Readers can visit my WEBSITE-- to read an excerpt of all of my books. I love to hear from readers. You can email be via my website, or contact me via Facebook  and Twitter 

Norm:

As this interview draws to a close what one question would you have liked me to ask you? Please share your answer. 

Pamela:

That question would be: What can readers do help sexually exploited  children?

Please donate your time and financial resources to the many organizations that are trying to end all forms of human trafficking. You'll find a list of a few of those organizations in the back of Anybody's Daughter. You can search the web for an organization in your community.

Norm: 

Thanks once again and good luck with all of your future endeavors

Follow Here To Learn More About Pamela Samuels Young and Her Books