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A Conversation With Laurie Stevens Author of The Dark Before Dawn and Deep Into Dusk
http://www.bookpleasures.com/websitepublisher/articles/6344/1/A-Conversation-With-Laurie-Stevens-Author-of-The-Dark-Before-Dawn-and-Deep-Into-Dusk/Page1.html
Norm Goldman


Reviewer & Author Interviewer, Norm Goldman. Norm is the Publisher & Editor of Bookpleasures.com.

He has been reviewing books for the past fifteen years when he retired from the legal profession.

To read more about Norm Follow Here






 
By Norm Goldman
Published on August 23, 2013
 



Norm Goldman, Publisher & Editor of Bookpleasures.com Interviews Laurie Stevens Author of The Dark Before Dawn and Deep Into Dusk


                                                                                                                                           


Bookpleasures is excited to have as our guest Laurie Stevens. Laurie has written for television (Chris Isaak's Guide to Jazz Fest),  for film (Footprint Films and John Daly's Film and Music Entertainment) and her stage play, Follow Your Dreams ran for eight weeks in Los Angeles. She has recently authored two books, The Dark Before Dawn and Deep Into Dusk.


Good day Laurie and thanks for participating in our interview

Norm:

How did you get started in writing? What keeps you going?

Laurie:

I've been writing ever since I was child. Remember those books that showed a picture and below that, lines you could create a story on? I still have a lot of those. I loved trying to think of a good story in regards to a particular picture. I still enjoy that type of challenge and that's what keeps me going. 

Norm:

I understand you are interested in psychology and forensics and both figure prominently in your two recent books, The Dark Before Dawn and Deep Into Dusk. Why have you been drawn to these two subject matters?

Laurie:

So much of our lives get messed up by making the wrong decisions or feeling badly about ourselves. I feel there's always a root cause that needs to be explored and I wonder why so many people ignore it. So, that is where the interest in psychology comes from.  Forensics just fascinate me.  The ability of technology to solve crimes interests me to no end.

Norm:

What has been the best part about being a published author?

Laurie: 

Getting in touch with readers.  Knowing the words in your head have come out across a page.  That is something every writer yearns for.

Norm:

Is your work improvisational or do you have a set plan?

Laurie:

Good question.  I'd have to say it's a little of both.  Sometimes I have a definate plan of action, but it can change on a whim or inspiration -- and then I'm improvising.

Norm:

What is your secret in keeping the intensity of the plot throughout the narrative particularly in Deep Into Dusk which I have reviewed?

Laurie:

The main character's angst and the line of work he's in propel alot of that intensity.  I know that I don't like the chapters to end on a flat line.  In fact, that's a sure way to dull things. 

Norm:

How did you go about creating your protagonist Detective Gabriel McRay in Deep Into Dusk and what was your main focus? As a follow up, how did you develop the plot and other characters? Did you use any set formula?

Laurie:

I wish I could say I was learned enough to use a formula, but I'm not:) Your question brings me back to what I mentioned about psychology. I wanted to bring that issue to life -- how a root cause (or multiple root causes) can adversely affect our lives. He's messed up in his relationship with himself (via work and hobbies) and his relationship with others (women, in particular). I suppose the character of Gabriel is not a true noir character type.  He has weaknesses and they do affect his decision-making, but unlike a noir protagonist, he is continually exploring his psyche, and trying to eradicate his weaknesses. 

In regards to developing plot and other characters, it's like this: each case to which Gabriel is assigned will "sting" whatever point he is at in his healing process.  I sort of think life works like that anyhow. The plot and characters have to be tailored to fit around that.

Norm:

Do you agree that to have good drama there must be an emotional charge that usually comes from the individual squaring off against antagonists either out in the world or within himself or herself? If so, please elaborate and how does it fit into you novels?

Laurie:

Oh, absolutely I agree.  The best conflicts come from people bouncing off of each other. I do admit though, to having Gabriel square off against his own inner demons. I use italics to create the more rational voice inside of him. 

Norm:

What, in your opinion, are the most important elements of good writing?

Laurie:

In my opinion? To tell the most honest story you can. My writing improved when I flicked the invisible judge off my shoulder.  

Norm:

Are you working on any books/projects that you would like to share with us? (We would love to hear all about them!)

Laurie:

Thanks! Well, the next in the Gabriel McRay series, The Mask of Midnight, is in the editing stages now. One of my short stories, "Kill Joy" is in the mystery anthology, Last Exit to Murder, which was just released last month. And I've been hired to co-write and co- produce a play.  

Norm:

What would you like to say to writers who are reading this interview and wondering if they can keep creating, if they are good enough, if their voices and visions matter enough to share?

Laurie:

Gosh, if you have words rolling around in your head, you are under obligation to put pen to paper.  I'm a believer that all things matter, including your words, so don't let your fears suppress your creative spirit. That would be a waste.

Norm:

Where can our readers find out more about you and your novels?

Laurie: 

I welcome the chance to touch base with people.  You can find me at my WEBSITE or on FACEBOOK

Norm:

As this interview draws to a close what one question would you have liked me to ask you? Please share your answer.

Laurie:

You asked good, introspective questions, so there's nothing I feel is missing.  It's been an honor and a pleasure.  Thanks, Norm.