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Meet Lindy DeKoven Television Executive, Producer and Author of Primetime Princess
http://www.bookpleasures.com/websitepublisher/articles/6145/1/Meet-Lindy-DeKoven-Television-Executive-Producer-and-Author-of-Primetime-Princess/Page1.html
Norm Goldman


Reviewer & Author Interviewer, Norm Goldman. Norm is the Publisher & Editor of Bookpleasures.com.

He has been reviewing books for the past fifteen years when he retired from the legal profession.

To read more about Norm Follow Here






 
By Norm Goldman
Published on June 25, 2013
 



Norm Goldman, Publisher & Editor of Bookpleasures.com Interviews Lindy DeKoven, Television Executive, Producer and Author of Primetime Princess


                                                                                                                                                                                                         


Today, Bookpleasures.com is pleased to have as our guest Lindy DeKoven. Lindy is a television executive, producer and author.

As Executive Vice President of Movies and Miniseries for NBC Entertainment and NBC Productions, DeKoven oversaw projects such as the Emmy award-winning Merlin, Gulliver's Travels, The Odyssey, Serving In Silence, as well as A Woman of Independent Means, The 60's, Noah's Ark, The Temptations, and Crime & Punishment, and many more.

Lindy has served as a television executive at Disney and Warner Brothers and was Executive Producer of a CBS sitcom and numerous comedy and drama pilots under a deal at CBS/Paramount.  She was appointed by Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger to the California Commission on the Status of Women, which she chaired for several years, and to the California Film Commission, where she continues to serve.

She sat on the Board of the Governor and First Lady's Women's Conference of California, the Koreh LA Literacy Group, the Museum of Television Executive Roundtable, The AFI Second Decade Council, The AFI Women's Directing Workshop Advisory Committee, Hollywood Radio & Television Society, and the Women in Film Executive Committee.  She is currently featured in the documentary film Miss Representation.

She has recently released her debut fiction novel, Primetime Princess.

Norm:

Good day Lindy and thanks for participating in our interview

Norm:

From reading your bio, I noticed that you have worn many hats. How did you decide you were ready to write Primetime Princess?

Lindy:

Well it came about rather unexpectedly. I had enrolled in a Women’s Fiction Writing Class through UCLA Extension. I had no idea what I was going to write, but figured I had some time to think about it.  However, the first chapter was due the following week. Fortunately, I’ve worked under pressure my entire career and had to adhere to many deadlines. So I sat down and began writing, and Primetime Princess came pouring out. 

Norm:

Can you share a little of the book with us?

Lindy:

The novel is about Alexa Ross, a young woman who is vice president of comedy development at Hawkeye Broadcasting Company in Los Angeles. She’s doing very well in her job. However, that changes when her boss hires Jerry Kellner to work for her. Jerry and Alexa have a history. Ten years ago Alexa was Jerry’s assistant. He was the boss from hell. Sleazy, obnoxious, and sexist. She couldn’t wait to get away from him. Now he works for her but he wants what Alexa wants; to be president of entertainment. It’s all out war as Jerry is determined to destroy Alexa. The pressure impinges on Alexa’s budding relationship with Gordon, which forces her to a breaking point. She wonders if she has the strength and determination to finally shatter the glass ceiling without ruining the rest of her life. 

Norm:

What purpose do you believe your story serves and what matters to you about the story?

Lindy:

I think the story about a young woman struggling to survive and thrive in a male dominated workplace is a universal theme. There are a lot more women in the workforce today, but less in senior management. I think it’s important for women, in particular, to know that they aren’t alone, that other women in other businesses face similar challenges. And that women who are senior managers aren’t necessarily the ball-busting stereotypes depicted in movies like Working Girl and Devil Wears Prada. That in fact, women who hold powerful positions can be vulnerable and insecure like everyone else and struggle with the choices they make.

Norm:

How did you go about creating the characters of Alexa Ross and Jerry Kellner?

Lindy:

Jerry Kellner came very easily to me, which says a lot, doesn’t it?! I don’t think I’m going to elaborate on that! Unfortunately, I think there are too many Jerry Kellners in the workplace. Alexa, on the other hand, was more complex. I wanted to create a flawed character, someone who has a powerful position and is secure in her ability to execute her responsibilities. But when it comes to a romantic relationship, she’s an absolute disaster. Women seem schizophrenic half the time. During the day they’re tough and aggressive and then at night they wait for a guy to open their car door. They struggle with their identity. Alexa embodies what many career women encounter. She puts on a good show, but is deeply conflicted. 

Norm:

How much of the book is realistic and are the experiences of Alexa Ross based on someone you know, or events in your own life? As a follow up, is there much of you in the book?

Lindy:

The book is pure fiction. I was exec vice president of movies & miniseries, not head of comedy, at a broadcast network. However,  I’m obviously acquainted with how television operates, how shows are developed, picked up, how executives work together on projects, how shows are marketed and promoted, etc. Readers who want to know what goes on behind the scenes at a TV network may find this story particularly interesting. 

Norm:

What is your secret in keeping the intensity of the plot throughout the narrative?

Lindy:

That’s a great question, and the secret is that I learned how to do that because of my experience developing TV movies. In order for a television movie to hold its audience over the course of two hours and sustain interest through six-minute commercial pods, it’s vital that the storyline is compelling and engaging. I learned how to create cliffhangers and engage the viewer emotionally so that he/she would return following each commercial break. If the story wasn’t powerful enough, we’d lose viewers which would cause the ratings to drop. So developing a strong story was critical to the movie’s success. I used that same approach when it came to writing Primetime Princess. I just pretended it was seven-act movie! 

Norm:

It is said that writers should write what they know. You clearly know about the business of television and Hollywood. Were there any elements of the book that forced you to step out of your comfort zone, and if so, how did you approach this part of the writing?

Lindy:

Absolutely. There were many characters and situations that were created to meet the needs of the storyline. Gordon, for example, wasn’t based on anyone I ever knew. He was made from whole cloth. I needed to understand his attitude, background, and what motivated him. I also didn’t know much about Vince Lombardi and the Green Bay Packers so it took a while to understand why Alexa’s father would be so enamored with them. Once something exceeds the bounds of credibility, I lose interest. So it was important that the characters and situations seemed as authentic as possible. 

Norm;

Did you learn anything from writing your book and what was it?

Lindy:

I learned that I could write a book. 

Norm:

Do you agree that to have good drama there must be an emotional charge that usually comes from the individual squaring off against antagonists either out in the world or within himself or herself? If so, please elaborate and how does it fit into you novel?

Lindy:

I believe in conflict. That’s where I began. I focused on who might provide the most difficulty for Alexa. As soon as I discovered Jerry I knew she would be in for a rough ride. Their relationship is so tempestuous and he is so vile. And yet they are forced to work together. That situation offered plenty of opportunity for external and internal conflict. But it’s also important to create multi-dimensional characters, as people generally aren’t all bad or all good. So there’s one scene where Jerry reveals a different persona, one Alexa isn’t the least bit familiar with. It’s a pivotal moment as Jerry’s actions force her to come to grips with her own conduct, which ultimately leads to her own self-discovery. 

Norm:

How has been the feed back concerning the book and do you hear much from male readers?

Lindy:

You know I really wasn’t expecting to hear from a lot of male readers yet their reactions have been very positive. Mostly they tell me how engaged they were in the storyline. And that’s music to my ears! 

Norm:

Where can our readers find out more about you and Primetime Princess?

Lindy:

On  LindyDeKoven.com

 
and

AMAZON.COM   

 
Norm:

What is next for Lindy DeKoven?

Lindy:

I have to deliver another novel in the next few months. I’m hunkered down in the writing cave working on it. But I need a break now and then from the horrific lonely environment of a writer. I was thrilled to take some time away from that story to answer your great questions about Primetime Princess

Norm:

As this interview draws to a close what one question would you have liked me to ask you? Please share your answer.

Lindy: 

Does the clerk at See’s Candies know you? The answer is yes! 


Norm:

Thanks once again and good luck with all of your future endeavors

Follow Here To Read Norm's Review of Primetime Princess


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