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Sam and Coodles – The Room at the End of the Hall Reviewed By Conny Crisalli of Bookpleasures.com
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Conny Withay







Reviewer Conny Withay:Operating her own business in office management since 1991, Conny is an avid reader, volunteers reading the Bible to the elderly, and makes handmade jewelry. A cum laude graduate with a degree in art living in the Pacific Northwest, she is married with two sons, two daughter-in-laws, and one granddaughter.

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By Conny Withay
Published on June 21, 2013
 


Author: Adrienne Durkin
Publisher: Juice Publishing, LLC
ISBN: 978-09850402-0-8






Author: Adrienne Durkin
Publisher: Juice Publishing, LLC
ISBN: 978-09850402-0-8

That room scares me. I hear noises coming from it when I’m in the hallway sometimes. Mommy and Daddy say the tree branches brush the window, but I don’t think so!” frightened Sam explains in the children’s book, Sam and Coodles – The Room at the End of the Hall, authored and illustrated by Adrienne Durkin.

Almost nine inches square, this first in the series hardcover book has thirty-two unnumbered pages with simple yet descriptive colorful illustrations on every other page. Targeted toward preschool or kindergarten age children and younger, the tome is especially written for those who are expecting a new brother or sister in the family. Due to the complicated wording, the book would be best read aloud to a beginner reader.

Only child Sam wants badly to be a big boy and big brother to his soon-to-arrive sister but he prefers to stay in his bedroom located next to his parents. Being afraid of the bedroom at the end of the hall, he confides to his stuffed armadillo, Coodles, he does not want to change rooms.

His daddy and mommy go into the room often to paint, decorate and arrange furniture and toys but Sam is still afraid to enter the room. Being told the room has something to do with skateboards, Sam’s curiosity is peaked so he drags his stuffed friend down the hall and enters into the changed, cheery and creative room, pleasantly surprised.

He tells both parents how much he loves the room and they explain that he is turning into a big boy and will soon be a wonderful big brother. The story ends with him asking if Coodles and he can name his sister. The last two pages are dedicated to fun facts about the strange looking armadillo that is a good teaching tool for older children.

While aimed toward a single child expecting a sibling, this story is a helpful aid to any child who is moving into a new house or room or one that is fascinated with armadillos. Durkin did an excellent job focusing on the child’s emotions while illustrating clearly the fear, joy and acceptance dealing with changes in a family’s dynamics. If one does not know much about this strange nine-banded “little armored thing,” this book is a good starting point for a youngster.

This book was furnished by the author for review purposes.


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