Author: Maureen Seaberg
ISBN: 978-1-60163-159-6
Publisher: Career Press, Inc. -- New Page Books


ClickHere To Purchase Tasting the Universe: People Who See Colors in Words and Rainbows in Symphonies



A fascinating insight into Synesthesia (a condition where one type of stimulation evokes the sensation of another, as when the hearing of a sound produces the visualisation of a colour).  Maureen Seaberg has been a synesthete all her life.  Her experience includes, seeing the letters of the alphabet in different colours, having out of body experiences, and seeing colours in her field of vision where there are none.  She was 27 before she found out she was a synesthete.  This lack of information about the subject, inspired Maureen Seaberg to want to find out as much as she could about it and put a book together, not only to help others but also to satisfy her own curiosity about this extraordinary trait that she and many others live with on a daily basis.  In this book, Maureen Seaberg takes us on a journey, spiritual and scientific, examining the current thoughts about Synesthesia, the history of scientific study into the area, and spiritual ideas about it. The author expresses her own views, talks to prominent figures in the scientific world about their views, and also talks to other synesthetes, including famous people, artists and writers, many of whom believe that Synesthesia helps them in their work.

Before I read this book, I knew a bit about the subject and was interested to learn more about individual experiences with Synesthesia.  I had always thought of it as a condition, which maybe would affect the way people live, but was surprised to learn that it appears to be something that can enhance a person’s life, and indeed the author sees it as a ‘gift’.
The idea behind putting the book together is to educate people as to what Synesthesia is, and how synesthetes view the world.  The author puts forward her view that rather than being a 'condition' caused by faulty wiring in the brain, as some scientists believe, it may be in fact a form of extra sensitivity which allows the synesthete to somehow tune into something in a higher realm.  The book explains how, in meditation, synesthetic episodes are often recorded in non-synesthetes, and some drugs can induce similar experiences.
It’s an interesting topic, and the book contains some profound views by synesthetes and scientists about the subject.

I enjoyed learning about how each synesthete interviewed by the author had different experiences of Synesthesia, and how varied and individualistic it is.
I agree with the author that it can only help to have more books, like this one, available for information about something which appears to be much more common than was once thought.  There are various links to websites and resources included in the book for people who may want to find out more.


ClickHere To Purchase Tasting the Universe: People Who See Colors in Words and Rainbows in Symphonies