Author: Bruce Kaler, M.D.

ISBN: 9781453770986

Publisher: Createspace

Click Here To Purchase Owners Manual for Injury Prevention (Volume 1)

Today, Norm Goldman Publisher and Editor of Bookpleasures.com is pleased to have as our guest, Dr. Bruce Kaler author of Owners Manual for Injury Prevention.

Good day Dr. Kaler and thanks for participating in our interview

Norm:

What motivated you to write Owners Manual for Injury Prevention and how does it differ from the thousands of books that are already on the market dealing with the same subject matter?

Dr. Kaler:

In my medical practice I have conversations daily with people about their illnesses and injuries. I treat people with problems that occur at home and on the job from a wide variety of industries. Across the board, people need information about their circumstances to prevent these injuries or participate in their treatment. I don’t think there is something that is as accessible or relevant in one easy primer that covers so many common problems. My clients have figuratively demanded this kind of book every day in my practice.

Norm:

Whom do you believe will benefit from your book and why?

Dr. Kaler

The injuries that the Owners Manual covers are the twenty most common we see at work and at play. There are several other very common problems that are universal to medical practice such as infection control, stress management, and other preventive measures that are simply part of our daily lives. Everyone at one time or another is a patient, even myself. So anybody will benefit from the informative background information in the Owners Manual. This has special importance to human resource managers and safety directors concerned about injury prevention in the workplace. You have to understand the nature of the injury to appreciate its importance and how to prevent it. During thirty years of practice I continue to have these same informative conversations with people about their predicaments.

Norm:

Why do many believe that is it essential to build a health care system that promotes prevention rather than just manages disease?

Dr. Kaler:

The bottom line is cost. It is well known that it is profoundly cheaper to spend our resources on prevention rather than trying to deal with a problem after it already has developed. The dollars spent upfront on education and providing needed resources to people costs less than chasing the acute problem after it has developed and flourished. It is literally and figuratively harder to treat any problem after the fact. Moreover we can reduce the number of these problems and limit the need for expensive lengthy treatments with the proverbial ounce of prevention. Unfortunately, there seems to be intrinsic resistance to spending our resources upfront because everyone sees it as a large down payment. Most would prefer to pay-as-you-go, which always turns out to be more expensive. Like the old joke when the car mechanic says with a wry smile on his face, “You can pay me now…or you can pay me later!”

Norm:

What are the  five most common causes of sports related injuries and how can they be prevented?

Dr. Kaler:

Injuries to the ankle, knee, lower back and upper extremities especially shoulder and elbow are very common. Some injuries are inevitable in contact sports. Many so called non-contact sports still have their share of incidental contact. Prevention has to be focused on excellent conditioning and teaching good fundamentals of the sport. Most athletes whether elite or recreational do not enjoy conditioning. Most injuries occur when the athlete is over reaching beyond their physical capacity. Injuries occur more often when fatigue affects their judgement or physical ability to perform. There is a right way and wrong way for everything. Teaching proper technique in execution is integral to performance in all sports. The athlete needs to understand that efficiency in movement and good technique leads to better performance and less injury. Professional athletes and those passionate about their athletic pastimes begin to appreciate how good conditioning not only prevents injury but enhances their performance. At the end of the day, it appeals to their competitive nature and satisfaction.

Norm:

As a follow up, what would be the five most common causes of work-related injuries and how can they be prevented?

Dr. Kaler:

Fatigue and stress play a big role. Most injuries occur at the end of the work shift when people are tired or inattentive. Improper use of tools and equipment also causes many injuries. The pressure of production or just being eager to finish the shift is a big factor. Proper use of tools, maintenance of equipment, thoughtful design of the work area with an eye towards safety and efficiency is important. Once again teaching good technique and conditioning appropriate for the job come into play. People need to understand the connection between good technique and making the job easier. Safety is the byproduct. Even an office job that seems safe and benign can be hazardous. Poor body mechanics and no regard for ergonomics leads to repetitive motion injuries and back injuries which tend to be so common at work or home. We all are like professional athletes. A certain amount of conditioning and proper body mechanics are key to enjoying activities of daily life.

Norm:

What do you love most about your work and why?

Dr. Kaler:

Teaching. What I do the most is share information with clients. The information is transformative and empowering for clients. I’ve long been an advocate of more health related content in basic education. I see the results from this deficiency in my practice daily. Patients tend to be remarkably uninformed about their bodies and health. Yet it is critical to their daily lives and livelihood. When individuals and industry begin to comprehend the staggering impact of accidents and just poor health on business and their daily lives, they take a keen interest in limiting the human and monetary loss. It is a privilege to motivate and enable people to be more productive and successful in their lives.

Norm:

Do you believe it is beneficial for medical doctors today to learn more about nonconventional approaches to the treatment of illnesses? Are you using any nonconventional approaches in your practice?

Dr. Kaler:

It is important to remain open to new information and techniques. History has proven that things change even those things we take for granted. In healthcare there is no one size fits all solution. There are strong patterns of behavior and disease that are well known. But understanding of all things in life keeps evolving. I often feel that I learn as much from my clients as I have to offer them.

Norm:

Since the time you graduated from medical school,  what do you feel has been the greatest advancement in the training of medical doctors?

Dr. Kaler:

In the United States over the last 50 years there has been a strong sense of consumerism. Greater demand by the consumer for transparency, quality and safety in all goods and services has evolved. In medical training this has injected more humanism. Physicians are expected to be professional and expert but better listeners, more respectful and responsive to the client. There is additional emphasis on communication skills to make the medical transaction between provider and patient more appropriate and in the end more effective. I see the doctor-patient relationship as a partnership. If I am not providing appropriate information in a useful manner to my client, I am not doing my job. This part of medical practice is not only mission critical, but the part of enjoy the most.

Norm:

Where can our readers find out more about you and Owners Manual for Injury Prevention?

Dr. Kaler:

Owners Manual for Injury Prevention and my mystery novel Turnabout are both available on Amazon.com, Smashwords.com and many other retail outlets. Visit my website http://seattledoc.com

Norm:

What is next for Dr. Bruce Kaler and is there anything else you wish to add?

Dr. Kaler:

I still see patients everyday in my practice and keep learning. I publish health related articles and blogs for several online outlets. I’ve started work on a new medical mystery novel. It will be very contemporary and thrilling. I don’t have a title yet, but I’m sure readers will relate to its everyday plausibility keeping them on the edge of their seat!

Thanks again for chatting with me Norm. It’s always a pleasure to visit.

Norm:

Thanks once again and good luck with all of your future endeavors

CLICK HERE TO READ NORM'S REVIEW OF OWNERS MANUAL FOR INJURY PREVENTION

Click Here To Purchase Owners Manual for Injury Prevention (Volume 1)