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Meet J.C, Hager author of Hunter's Choice and‭ ‬Hunter's Secret:‭ ‬Wreck of Carol K
http://www.bookpleasures.com/websitepublisher/articles/2771/1/Meet-JC-Hager-author-of-Hunters-Choice-and-Hunters-Secret-Wreck-of-Carol-K/Page1.html
Norm Goldman


Reviewer & Author Interviewer, Norm Goldman. Norm is the Publisher & Editor of Bookpleasures.com.

He has been reviewing books for the past fifteen years when he retired from the legal profession.

To read more about Norm Follow Here






 
By Norm Goldman
Published on September 2, 2010
 


Norm Goldman, Publisher & Editor of Bookpleasures.com interviews
J.C, Hager author of Hunter's Choice and‭ ‬Hunter's Secret:‭ ‬Wreck of Carol K

                           


Author: J.C. Hager

Publisher: Greenstone Publishing LLC

ISBN: 978-0-9797546-6-1

Click Here To Purchase Hunter's Secret



Today, Norm Goldman Publisher & Editor of Bookpleasures.com is pleased to have as our guest J.C, Hager author of Hunter's Choice and‭ ‬Hunter's Secret:‭ ‬Wreck of Carol K.

‭Good day J.C. and thanks for participating in our interview

‭Norm:

‭ ‬Hunter's Secret:‭ ‬Wreck of Carol K is your second novel. What keeps you going as a writer and did you find the writing process- easier or more difficult than your first novel?

J.C.
I enjoy the research, the mental challenge and the flights of fantasy that writing gives me. The second novel was completed much faster and easier than the first. My structure and organization was better. The voice came easier and more consistently. The physical process was much more efficient and the editing and blurb distribution was all electronic. Book I had a dozen manuscripts and five revisions, each using a ream of paper. Book II hardly made a ripple in the paper-pulp industry- only one real manuscript was produced. My editors were all using MS word, working by chapters. Our choreography became efficient and only a few times did we have to go back and rework a character or plot point through multiple chapters.  I even distributed AD HOC parts of the book by chapters to the various experts to make sure we were accurate on many technical points.

Norm:

Is your work improvisational or do you have a set plan?

J.C.
Yes! I have plans in my mind, files of research that support the plans, then the story blends the plot, research and the interactions of the characters.
Sometime the plan goes astray- those darn characters have their own will- they tell me how they feel and I type it! I'm sure some psychologist could explain the process, but I enjoy it- it makes the book interesting to me, not just a report or a parroting of a cut-and-dry plot.
Norm:

What's the most difficult thing for you about being a writer?

J.C. 
My teacher, manager background makes me want to explain too much. I fight putting in too much detail all the time. What is really interesting to me may bore to tears many others. I know many readers like information and facts that back up the story- I try to reach a happy medium. During one of my IBM training classes, I was critiqued during a product presentation because of too much explanation- “Ask him the time and he will tell you how to build a watch..."
After that when I was asked how a particular processor worked, I'd say,”Really fast!"

Norm:

If you had to choose, which writer would you consider a mentor?

J.C.
My mentors are in the scores of fine writers- Mitchner, Follett, Clancy, Griffin and more. John D. McDonald had the best 'voice' in his characters- they talked and thought- you became part of their life and actions. Elmore Leonard's advice for writers is always near my desk- on my five drawer filing cabinet.
He even replied to a letter of mine- about picking a voice- I treasure his personally typed note. Steve Hamilton- a fine writer and fellow IBMer gave me a lot of help and advice. I will always be grateful to him.
 
Norm:

What was one of the most surprising things you learned in creating your books?

J.C. 
I'm always pleasantly surprised by friends and readers who get into the story and characters as much as I do.  It is a real responsibility to do a good job, because so many are trusting you with their satisfaction.

Norm:

What is your secret in keeping the intensity of the plot throughout Hunter's Choice and‭ ‬Hunter's Secret:‭ ‬Wreck of Carol K?

J.C.
So far in both books, Matt sees, tells and thinks the story.  There are no flash backs, multiple character views, multiple plots, or parallel chapters.
I tried not to break any sequences. If something happens out of Matt's view or hearing- he has to get the news for the action to get into the story.
I may change this in the third book. Tanya may do some describing and have parallel adventures.

Norm:

How much real-life do you put into your fiction? Is there much “you” in there?

J.C.
Matt was a teacher, coach and lives in the UP. He has traveled and been many places that I've enjoyed.  He is younger, stronger, braver and better looking than me. He thinks like the science teacher, athlete he was. My locations are all real and places I've been. He is the better than average everyman. Hopefully people can relate to his reactions and thoughts.

Norm:

How did you create the Livingston brothers in
Hunter's Choice and‭ ‬Hunter's Secret:‭ ‬Wreck of Carol K?

J.C.
The Livingston brothers were named after my Aunt Helen Livingston from Toronto. I needed some bad guys- they just happened to be Canadian. I needed the international aspect for the shipwreck laws complexity and the fact the Canadian Statute of Limitations differs from the U.S. I could never say anything really bad about Canadians- I know too many wonderful one- including my Dad who was born in Hagersville, OT .

Norm:

What did you enjoy most about writing
Hunter's Choice and‭ ‬Hunter's Secret:‭ ‬Wreck of Carol K? As a follow up what obstacles did you have in trying to tell your story?

J.C.
I enjoy the all aspects of writing. Even editing and criticism can be seen as a way to get a good result- like plowing a straight furrel, planting correctly, weeding and finally producing something that is worthy and appreciated.

Norm:

What is your typical workday like? Do you stick to a writing schedule?

J.C.
I write in the morning- often drawn from the bed with ideas. My late night work sometimes goes too long and I don't get to bed for hours.
Most of my best work is during bad weather- my mind takes me to good places. 

Norm:

Do you have a local writing community or fellow writers that you look to for support and advice?  Did you have a writing mentor? Do you mentor others here?

J.C.
I'm a member of The Upper Peninsula Publishers and Author's group, SPAN, and take Writers Digest. My best and indispensable mentor, editor and all around great person is Walt Shiel- former jet pilot turned literary guru.  His wife paints the book covers- another super gifted person.

Norm:

What are you upcoming projects?

J.C.
Book III will start in the Florida Keys, go into the Caribbean, get into trouble with Cuban and Mexican patrol boats, have scenes in a Cuban prison.
I'm researching Cuba and all aspects of their ex-patriots and the ever changing US laws.  I think it is a shame we allow such inhuman cruelty so close to our shores of freedom and justice. I wish some of the energy that the environmentalist waste on snail darters and deer-eating wolves could be directed to righting the wrongs being done every day to a fine people.

Norm:

Where can our readers find out more about you and your novels?

J.C.
They can go to JCHAGER.COM my web site. There is a lot of information about both books and some egotistic bio information

Norm:

Is there anything else you wish to add that we have not covered?

J.C.
This e-interview covers many aspects of my writing life and style. I hope people can enjoy my efforts. I want to produce a good read.

Norm

Thanks once again and good luck with all of your future endeavors



CLICK HERE TO READ NORM'S REVIEW OF HUNTER'S SECRET