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Kiefer Sutherland, Living Dangerously Reviewed By Amy Lignor Of Bookpleasures.com
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Amy Lignor

Reviewer Amy Lignor: Amy is the author of a historical fiction novel entitled The Heart of a Legend, and Mind Made, a work of science fiction. Presently, she is writing an adventure series set in the New York Public Library, as well as a teen fiction series, The Angel Chronicles.  She is an avid traveler and has been fortunate to have journeyed across the USA, where she has met the most amazing people, who truly bring life and soul to her books.  She lives in the Land of Enchantment (for now) with her gorgeous daughter, Shelby, her wonderful Mom, Mary, and the greatest friend and critic in the entire world - her dog, Reuben

 
By Amy Lignor
Published on March 7, 2010
 

Author:  Biographer, Christopher Heard
ISBN:  978-1-926745-04-6

This is a poignant book showing the split personalities of a much-beloved actor who has made bad decisions over time - like the rest of us



Author:  Biographer, Christopher Heard
ISBN:  978-1-926745-04-6

Click Here To Purchase Kiefer Sutherland: Living Dangerously

Even if you're not Jack Bauer, the clock is ticking.  Usually at times of crisis, especially nowadays, we can all hear that high-pitched "Bam!" that's taking away the seconds that we need in order to make life better.  Perhaps Kiefer Sutherland hears that clock beating inside of his own brain, as he goes through the twists and turns of his life.  As a fan of Sutherland, I have watched him grow up alongside me in his movie roles and his...errors in judgment.  For a long time I truly believed that I was watching a split personality in action.  On screen he could play the "bad guy" or the romantic lead - using that incredible and distinguishable voice to either melt a heart or scare it to death.  There have been many biographies depicting his life, but Mr. Heard has done a wonderful job humanizing the actor in this latest attempt.

Sutherland's mother is an interesting character.  Her father was, in fact, the man mainly responsible for Canada's socialized medical system (which works so well, America should really look into it a little more).  His mother was also a political rights activist and very rarely ever sat on a couch and lazed the day away.  Not only did she help in creating the organization of the Friends of the Black Panthers, but she's also an extremely talented artist who was awarded a star on Canada's Walk of Fame.  Now, we all know the male lineage that Sutherland derives from.  His father, Donald, made his mark on screen a long time ago and has become a beloved actor that America is extremely proud of.  And, perhaps, if Kiefer had simply followed in his father's footsteps and used his celebrity to garner his own, than he wouldn't have made it off the cutting room floor.  But Kiefer chose another route - learning, watching, listening, and playing the characters with charm and grace - wanting to please his parents instead of simply living off their careers.  He is the twin of Rachel who, after reading this book, is someone I think I would get along with very well.  She does the hard work "out of the spotlight" choosing to let Kiefer be the face, while she built a career behind the scenes.

 At sixteen, Kiefer was cast in his first role in a movie called The Bay Boy.  This is a part he not only threw his heart and soul into, but also smoked alot of cigarettes in order to achieve that great, gravely voice that fans have come to love.  When his career resume added the name of Steven Spielberg - working with the great man on one of his Amazing Stories - then a windfall of roles came to the young man.  One early on, (and I have to say, my favorite still) was The Lost Boys.  I look around at the vampire-craze nowadays and wish that there was a movie out there that depicted vampires in all their glory instead of making them a sappy representation of what Kiefer once nailed on screen.  Young Guns, as well, was a favorite of mine, leading me to write a story featuring Billy the Kid much later on in my life.  And the great and forgotten movie Article 99, which was so good that I could watch it over and over again for the story, alone.  I could, of course, go on and on with the celebrity "goofs" and screen roles that Sutherland played, but I digress.  Because, as I said before, this biography is not only a litany of the ups and downs of an acting career, but the ups and downs of a man's life.

At 20, Kiefer became a father - a role he was so not ready to play.  The future played out much better for his relationship with his daughter, as he has come, over time, to appreciate the woman he had a hand in creating.  The girl seems steadfastly loyal, as well as a creative woman who may end up gracing the screen with her famous father before it's all said and done.  Kiefer had a time where the wild west seemed to call to him and he left the glory of Hollywood behind to join a team that competed in roping, cattle, and horse events.  Proving he had a career to fall back on came from this moment in his life.  The debut of 24, right after the tragedy of September 11th, seemed to pole-vault Kiefer into the stratosphere.  Not only was the money a grand thing, but the actual character seemed to "firm" us up as a people - showing that if one man could stand against terrorism and the ultimate "bad guys:," than we as a country could not be defeated.  And that's really what Jack Bauer has taught us all.  Freedom is a gift worth fighting for, and watching that man take on the world as time ticks off the clock has made us all feel much better about "winning" in the end.

 This is a poignant book showing the split personalities of a much-beloved actor who has made bad decisions over time - like the rest of us.  He's served his time on many occasions, whether it be in his own head or in a jail cell because of foolishness.  In person, he can be a drunkard that is loud and obnoxious, or a considerate, quiet man, who's just trying to find a way to make the right decisions and live, above all else, with no regrets.  (I even know what on screen role should be in his future, and if he wants to know the title of the series, I'll be waiting by the phone).

  Click Here To Purchase Kiefer Sutherland: Living Dangerously