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Kip Moore, author of Second Chance: The Story of a Father's Faith, a Mother's Strength, and a Child's Will to Live talks to Andrea Coventry Of Bookpleasures.com
http://www.bookpleasures.com/websitepublisher/articles/1660/1/Kip-Moore-author-of-Second-Chance-The-Story-of-a-Fathers-Faith-a-Mothers-Strength-and-a-Childs-Will-to-Live-talks-to-Andrea-Coventry-Of-Bookpleasurescom/Page1.html
Andrea Coventry

Reviewer Andrea Coventry: Andrea is a Montessori child - turned educator.  An avid reader and writer, she is published on several websites. Click Here to find a listing of Andrea's sites where you can find many of her writing contributions.



 
By Andrea Coventry
Published on December 8, 2009
 



Author:  Kip Moore
Publisher:  Second Chance Publishing, LLC
ISBN:  978-0-9841673-5-7



Kip Moore, author of Second Chance: The Story of a Father's Faith, a Mother's Strength, and a Child's Will to Live talks to Andrea Coventry, one of bookpleasures' reviewers  about his family's experience with E.coli




Author:  Kip Moore
Publisher:  Second Chance Publishing, LLC
ISBN:  978-0-9841673-5-7


Click Here To Purchase Second Chance

Today Kip Moore, author of Second Chance: The Story of a Father's Faith, a Mother's Strength, and a Child's Will to Live talks to Andrea Coventry, one of bookpleasures' reviewers  about his family's experience with E.coli.

Andrea:

Why did you choose to write this book and share your story?

Kip:

I felt it was important that we share our story with others and try and make a difference. My wife and I feel so lucky to still have our son with us today. By writing the book and providing presentations about food-borne illness, maybe we can save another child and family from going through what we did. I also felt it would be therapeutic to put all that we encountered down on paper in an effort to put the guilt behind me. I still carry it with me today because I fed Chance the meal that nearly cost him his life.

Andrea:

What are your thoughts on the irony of your son being named Chance?

Kip:

We named our son Chance after my wife and I had our second chance at love. Little did we know just how appropriate his name would truly turn out to be. There isn't a day that goes by that I don't think about how Chance received a second chance at life.

Andrea:

Please share something about your son with us.

Kip:

Chance lives every day to the fullest. It's almost like he knows he almost didn't make it. He loves to plan out every minute of the day. For example, "Mommy, we are going to wake up tomorrow and have pancakes, then let's go to the rec center and swim, and when we get home I want to watch the Disney Channel while you make me a peanut butter sandwich ....."

Andrea:

Your story is similar to, yet has a happier outcome, than one shared in the movie Food Inc. Did you see that movie? What are your thoughts?

Kip:

I think it's admirable that the producer, Robert Kenner, took the initiative to make the film. It's telling that this subject is becoming more and more prevalent - it's an important topic and the movie will really help create awareness.

Andrea:

What do parents need to know and understand about the dangers of E.coli?

Kip:

First, educate yourself. I honestly didn't know anything about E.coli or any food-borne illnesses. I was naive and just assumed the food that my family and I ate was safe. There are many websites available that educate consumers about the dangers of E.coli and other food-borne illnesses. There are many simple things parents should do to protect their families. Buy a meat thermometer and cook all beef to 160 degrees. This will kill any possible bacteria in the meat. Wash your fruits and vegetables thoroughly in hot water before eating. Wipe off your counter tops with bacteria disinfectant. E.coli is deadly and you can't afford not to take precautions. Of course you can't control what you eat in a restaurant, but you can choose not to feed young children ground beef products in a restaurant just to be safe.

Andrea:

What signs should they look for?

Kip:

The illness looks and feels like you have the flu. Common symptoms include achiness, vomiting and/or diarrhea. This is what makes E.coli so dangerous. It is often misdiagnosed and unfortunately it is often too late to save the child. If you see blood in your child's stool go to the hospital immediately!

Andrea:

Where can people go to get more information about E.coli?

Kip:

The most informative web sites are www.safetables.org, and http://www.foodsafetyworkinggroup.gov/ (President Obama started this site in March), http://www.cdc.gov/ecoli/ (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention).

Andrea:

Where can parents turn for help, especially those who do not have as many resources such as friends and family?

Kip:

Educating yourself is paramount in protecting your family. Use the websites listed above and become aware of the signs to look for so you can react quickly. Safe Tables has a 1-800 victim's support hotline that you can call. If you think your child has been infected with E.coli, tell the doctors and nurses to test for it. This is a difficult disease to diagnose, because it appears to be the flu. Tell the hospital personnel what your child has eaten - and if you don't think they are being proactive enough be a strong advocate for your child or family member. Go to another hospital if you have to.

Andrea:

Where can parents get information on their rights, especially as it concerns time off of work, insurance, etc.?

Kip:

We faced this question a couple of days after being admitted into The Children's Hospital. We contacted our employers and began to explore our medical coverage through our insurer. We had to contact the insurance company directly and have them explain what coverage we had in Chance's care. My wife also had to take advantage of the Family Leave Act which allowed her to take a specified period of time off work without the risk of losing her job.

Andrea:

What advice do you have for families going through a similar experience?

Kip:

Three themes I would encourage any parents with a severely sick child to remember; teamwork, communication, and be your own advocate. The moment to moment pressure and stress can be unbearable, not to mention that you have gone for several days with little to no sleep. It is imperative that both parents work as a team to think through and solve each and every crisis that they are presented with throughout the ordeal. Threat each other with patience, respect, and love. You must communicate effectively with each other to handle the crisis. Also remember, you must be your own advocate when it comes to your child's health. You know your child better than anyone else. Trust your instincts if you feel that something is not right and then take action with the medical staff to get the assistance that you need. In our case, we couldn't afford to hesitate or it might have cost Chance his life. Trust your instincts! If you think something is wrong, chances are they are. You know your child better than anyone.

Andrea:

What would you like medical personnel to know about the ordeal from a parents' perspective?

Kip:

Understand and be sensitive to what the parents are going through. Seeing your own child in pain that can't be resolved is the worst nightmare a parent can face. This is their child, the most precious person in a parent's life. I'm sure our doctors thought I was a big pain! I was constantly asking questions of the medical staff and when something needed to be done I was relentless in making sure they provided the care my son needed as quickly as possible.

Andrea:

How did your faith get you through?

Kip:

Trust me, my faith was tested many times through our experience. I'd be lying if I didn't share that I had moments of doubt. On the day that we received Chance's diagnoses that he had HUS 0157:H7 I went to the hospital chapel and prayed. It is difficult to explain, but I had a vision that I would carry Chance out of the hospital healthy. I held tightly to that thought and refused to let go of it. Even when hope felt lost, I trusted that God had a bigger plan for all of us and that he would help guide Chance back to full health.

Andrea:

The Children's Hospital where Chance stayed is now closed. Are you still in contact with any of the people who helped so much, such as Dr. Fitzgerald, or Molly the nurse?

Kip:

Yes, we have stayed in touch with several of the doctors and nurses who were so important to us during Chance's illness. We continue to email pictures of Chance on holidays to Dr Stanga and Dr Fitzgerald. Nurse Molly will always hold a special place in our hearts. We email her on a regular basis. Molly has children of her own now, and we are able to share in her joy with them. When we held a family book signing party Dr Stanga and Dr Bacon were able to attend.

Andrea:

How has your family changed since the experience?

Kip:

What a great question. We don't tend to dwell on little daily problems any more. Those problems seem irrelevant after what we faced. We rejoice in having each other every day. I hug and kiss my kids more now and tell them that I love them. We still have pieces of the grey electrical tape on our garage that held the "Welcome Home" sign up when Marti and Chance returned home from the hospital. I have never tried to remove those pieces of tape. Every night when I pull into my garage after a long day at work I see the tape and I'm reminded of just how lucky and blessed I am to have my family.

Andrea:

What are some of the most important lessons learned from your experience?

Kip:

There are so many. To put it simply, every day is a gift. It is so easy in our world today to get caught up in daily stresses and problems that we lose track of what is truly important - family. People are so focused on their careers or trying to build something to leave their mark in this world. My legacy will not be based on how many books I sell, but hopefully on making a difference by helping others and the relationship I have with my wife and children. I have often said that my children are the best part of me. They are my legacy.

Andrea:

How are you involved in raising awareness of food borne illnesses?

Kip:

I love providing public presentations to share our story and educate people about the dangers of food-borne illnesses. I am also a member of Safe Tables Our Priority (STOP) which is a non-profit organization that is actively involved in bringing about food safety legislative reform in our country. I get in touch with parents who have gone through similar experiences and support them to the best of my abilities. I have been fortunate enough to work in partnership with leaders like US Congresswoman Diana DeGette by sharing our story at her press conferences. Congresswoman DeGette was a co-sponsor to the house bill which passed this July and will hopefully bring food reform to our country. Finally, I provide a blog on our website where I share informative stories and information about food-borne illnesses.

Andrea:

How can others become involved?

Kip:

Join and support organization like Safe Tables Our Priority. Contact your senators and congress representatives in your district and encourage them to support the food safety initiatives currently being considered in the House and Senate.

Andrea:

Where can people get more information about you?

Kip:

The best place is our website at www.secondchancestory.com

Andrea:

How can readers get in contact with you?

Kip:

I love communicating with the readers. Don't hesitate to send me an email at kip@secondchancestory.com or simply pick up the telephone and call me at 720-560-9912.

Andrea:

Is there anything else you would like to share with readers?

Kip:

I sign every book with the following-"Cherish every moment!" I think that says it all.


Andrea:

Thank you so much for your time and for sharing your story.

Click Here To Purchase Second Chance