Author: Jeffrey A. Friedberg
ISBN: 978-0-9789247-2-0
Publisher: Indi Publishing Group

Click Here To Purchase BLACK ROAD 2012

Today, Norm Goldman, Publisher & Editor of Bookpleasures.com is pleased to have as our guest, Jeffrey A. Friedberg,  author of Black Road 2012: Empire of the Gods-Book 1 The God Conspiracy.

Jeffrey was a private eye for 32 years in various US States. His speciality was in deep investigation, undercover, commercial fraud and theft, surveillance and mobile video, homicide, wrongful/accidental death, organized crime, internet and data- mining, computer fraud, missing persons, video and motion analysis, armed and K-9 security guards, expert witness courtroom testimony, photography, crime of money laundering, assets, counterfeiting, nuclear plant personnel screening and public utilities protection (DOD clearance), personal defence and more. He was also an Internet website guru, Internet marketer, and an Internet consultant at America Online. In addition, he has a BA in English and Psychology/Sociology. Jeffrey lives and writes under the shadow of a volcano in Albuquerque, New Mexico.

Good day Jeffrey and thanks for participating in our interview.

Norm:

What motivated you to write a paranormal thriller?

 Jeffrey:

Yes, Norm, I’m gratified to be here with you. Writing paranormal is just what I like to do most. I like the format because of the freedom it lends imagination, and I like to buttress it with research and facts and create a universe. My characters populate that universe, walk around in it, and they write the story for me, little living metaphors in a universe of adjectives and adverbs, nouns, and all the magical rest of it.

Norm:

What do you believe makes a good paranormal thriller?

Jeffrey:

Structure, imagination, and pacing. The structure and pacing must carry the story forward in such a way that the reader always turns the page. And imagination is of course what brings the reader’s mind congruent with that of the writer—the writer magically makes the reader see what the writer sees. The book needs to be paced in ever increasing rates of speed and action and turmoil and growth so that the ending leaves the reader breathless and thrilled.

Norm:

How did you develop the plot and characters? Did you use any set formula? What was your focus when you created your protagonist, Jack Vane?

Jeffrey:

There’s no formula but I use a list of 7 or 22 steps in the highly intuitive and fluid John Truby method. These aren’t plug-ins or hard and fast things you must do—they are sequences the human mind expects to see in any mythology—and that’s what I write. What the brain seeks is a ghost-story, or past for the character, weaknesses, needs, desires, revelations, a Plan for action, allies, opponents, change and growth. Bu these are in no fixed order. Jack Vane just popped into my head one day fully formed, and since he does whatever the hell he wants anyway, I just let him write the story for me.

Norm:

Where did you get your information and ideas for Black Road 2012?

Jeffrey

From a prior work, where I used twins—darkness and light—and then I ran across the Navajo Hero twins, and that took me to the Mayans, and that took me to 2012. I read about 21 books on Native American religion, magic, and witchcraft.  And I used the internet, primarily John Major Jenkins’ work on 2012

Norm:

What are the preponderant influences on your writing?

Jeffrey:

Life on the street as a private detective, life’s ups and downs—a lifetime. Philosophy, religion, politics, the news, reality, science, history, things like that. I spent a lot of time in the back of a surveillance van and there’s not much to do there except watch and think. Elmore Leonard, Tom Clancy, Raymond Chandler, Mickey Spillane, Frank Herbert, Asimov, Bradbury, Clive Barker, Louis L’Amour, Wilbur Smith, people like that—and Joseph Campbell and Joseph Campbell and Joseph Campbell.

Norm:

Did you read any special books on how to write?  Is there anything you find particularly challenging in your writing?

Jeffrey:

I read the usual books, about 11 or 15, I can’t remember, all interesting but not really helpful. Courses didn’t help me. What freed me was my editor Diane O’Connell telling me to cut, cut, cut—the more I cut the better it looked. That, and the intuitive Truby method. I thank another editor Nancy McCurry for teaching me a lot about writing and presentation. The challenging part of writing for me in the sense that I love it is the words and how they look and what pictures they make. I try to make every scene visual as any movie.

Norm

What has been the best part about being published?

Jeffrey:

An initial rush, something to point to and post on the website, a sense of al most-accomplishment. And then the reality of sales and the Industry sets in.

Norm:

Do you feel that writers, regardless of genre owe something to readers, if not, why not, if so, why and what would that be?

Jeffrey:

A writer owes the reader respect and a good effort. The writer should give the reader credit for intelligence, let them make their own analysis, and that way let the reader be part of the story. Nobody cares what the writer likes, what kind of after-shave, what fashion line or brand of smokes or vodka. The reader is there for the story and the thrill, not the writer’s self-indulgence.

Norm:

Where can our readers find out more about you and Black Road 2012?

Jeffrey:

On my WEBSITE

Norm:

Is there anything else you wish to add that we have not covered?

Jeffrey:

Writing, research, and reality are bliss to me. I encourage anyone who wants to write to just do it. Write your heart out, passionately and completely, you can always take out the crazy or boring parts, but write it, and don’t listen to any negative criticism from anyone who has no idea what this craft is all about: it’s magic to make someone else see what you see. Anyone can do it. No book ever got published by not writing it.

Thanks once again and good luck with Black Road 2012.

 Click Here To Read Norm's Review Of Black Road 2012

Click Here To Purchase BLACK ROAD 2012